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Author Interview with Franklin Posner

Author Interview with Franklin Posner

interviewed on Mar 22, 2019 Gresham, OR
Q. How would you describe yourself?
I'm a regular guy with a regular day (actually evening) job, and bills and a mortgage to pay, who also writes books for fun (and, hopefully one day) money.
Q. Tell us something about the books that you have written and the story behind them.
The "Suburban Vampire" series is centered around the character Scott Campbell, a 40-something everyman and likable loser at life who is forcibly turned into a vampire by a rogue vampire named Jack. The stories tell of Scott's struggle to hold on to his humanity and his faith despite the hunger he now feels and the temptations he faces. The second story, "Suburban Vampire Ragnarok", describes the further misadventures of Scott as he attempts to negotiate the dark new world he has been thrust into
Q. What place does writing hold in your life, how has been your writing journey so far?
I'd say it's of utmost importance, since it's my passion and my art. My journey has so far been rocky; for the longest time, I struggled with even writing a book-length project, then found that, after my first novel, I couldn't stop. However, getting my work out there has been an ongoing struggle, and I've had to deal with rejections, slow sales, and simply getting my brand recognized.
Q. What is your writing process, a typical writing day routine?
I don't really have much of a routine or a process. I try to write at least a page a day, but some days I will take a break to recharge and find inspiration, then get back to it the next day.
Q. What book marketing techniques have been most effective for you?
That's what I'm trying to figure out. Right now, I seem to be selling books primarily by word-of-mouth. It's a work in progress.
Q. What do you think makes a book sell, or makes a reader buy it?
Again, that's what I'm trying to figure out. A hefty dose of marketing goes a long way toward this goal, as well as the creation of familiarity with the author and their work.
Q. What's the most moving or affecting thing a reader has said to you?
It was from my mother, not long before she passed away. She told me that my books were among the best she'd read (and she was a very well-read woman, having read various novels from various genres by various 'big-name' writers), that she believed in me, and that I needed to get my work out there so that others could read it.
Q. What are your favourite three books, and why?
1. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee -- I know, everyone says this, but it's true. I had to read it as an assignment in school, and was blown away. I was transported to the rural south and could actually see myself hanging out with Jem and Scout during those turbulent times. The mix of youthful innocence and terrible injustice created a dissonance that echoed in my mind.
2. The New Centurions by Joseph Wambaugh -- I was really into detective/spy/police thrillers at one time, and this was the most hard-hitting and visceral of them all. It is another story of the loss of innocence, as idealistic young police officers are thrown into the meat grinder and come out hardened, jaded, and cynical. However, you still root for these flawed and broken heroes, and want there to be a fairytale ending for them, but you know it's not coming.
3. Killer Instinct by Larry Pike -- this one is a bit more obscure, but it was the first book I read that successfully combined the police procedural and the supernatural/urban fantasy thriller. It's the story of a series of murders committed by a werewolf and the police detective who hunts the monster down. It was directly influential on me and my work, for both the basic concept and the fact that I knew the author personally. Sadly, it was the only book he wrote.
Q. Who are your favourite three authors and what do you like the most about them?
C.S. Lewis -- A true intellectual of his time and creator of a brilliant mythos with his Narnia series. Although these are books written for children, they are not written "down" to them and can be enjoyed by adults. Also, his Screwtape Letters is still one of the most brilliant works of religious fiction ever written.
Larry Correia -- A fun author. His work is fun to read, and you can tell he had fun writing them. His Monster Hunter International series was highly influential on my work.
Ian Fleming -- Like most people nowadays, my introduction to James Bond was in the movies. However, as is the case with me, I like to seek out the source material -- in this case the work of Ian Fleming. The books are, of course, nothing like the movies. Fleming made his characters, including Bond, very real and very earthy, as opposed to the lightweight playboys of the movies. His Bond could be hurt and could feel raw emotion. From Russia with Love remains one of the best spy novels ever written. Fleming did this with strong characters and good storytelling, not with flash and whiz-bang gadgets.
Q. Tell us about the books that you are currently writing and their progress.
I've already written the third and fourth installments in the Suburban Vampire series, as well as an Origin story tie-in and one project not in the Suburban Vampire series. I am currently working on the fifth novel in the Suburban Vampire series, which is going slowly. This is for a couple reasons: one, I have the previously mentioned works I've already completed and have not yet published, so I'm taking my time. Two, this novel is quite long and filled with a lot of very heavy elements, such as loss and dysfunctional family relationships.
Q. What challenges do you think are faced by writers, what's the worst thing about the book industry according to you?
I think the biggest challenge is the publishing industry itself, which plays into the second part of your question. The book industry tends to be very conservative and averse to risk-taking. They seem to be looking for the next (author name/book name here) and not as willing to take risks on new and unknown authors.
Q. Apart from writing, what goals do you want to achieve in life?
Writing was a pretty major goal for me, and right now, that's my focus. Until I feel I've reached my 'peak' or 'potential', that's where I've camped out right now. Until I reach those heights, writing is its own goal.
Q. What message do you want to share with budding writers?
Don't quit, don't give up. Keep writing. If you're in the middle of a project and feel discouraged, just keep going until you finish. It may be the worst piece of crap you've read (in your mind), but do it anyway. You can always go back and correct/edit it later.

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About the author
I have been interested in writing as an avocation or career for most of my life (I must have been about ten years old when I wrote my first book -- it was, of course, very simple, but it had a plot and distinct characters). However, I never truly pursued the craft. I\'d occasionally begin a project, then scrap it in frustration and come to the conclusion that I\'d never get anywhere. I eventually decided to stop giving up on myself, and about four years ago, I followed through on a project and ...more